Ramblersville

Auto Wrecker in Ramblersville, New York City

  • WE PAY TOP DOLLAR FOR ALL MAKES AND MODELS.
  • GET THE BEST PRICE FOR YOUR VEHICLE.
  • WE ARE THE ESTABLISHMENT WHO BUYS JUNK CARS NEAR ME.
  • WE MOSTLY SCHEDULE SAME DAY PICKUPS.
  • FREE TOWING ON ALL OUR PURCHASES.
  • HIGHLY REVIEWED CUSTOMER SERVICE STAFF.
  • WE HAVE PAID ANYWHERE FROM $500 TO $50,000 CASH FOR VEHICLES.
  • CALL US FOR AN INSTANT QUOTE.
  • WE HAVE BEEN RECOGNIZED AS ONE OF THE BEST PLACES THAT BUY JUNK AUTOMOBILES.
  • OUR REMOVAL SERVICE IS ONE OF THE HIGHEST RATED IN THE CITY.
  • NO TITLE, NO PROBLEM. CALL US WE WILL GET RID OF YOUR JALOPY FOR GOOD.

We buy junk cars and pay cash on the spot. Sell your car to us, for we will pay you the amount of money you were offered over the phone, guaranteed. We can also take vehicles as donations and provide you with a tax write off. 

The process is simple. Give us a call. One of our representatives will tell you how much we can pay you for your vehicle. We schedule a time to pick up your vehicle within a little as an hour’s time. The driver will call you once he is on his way. Upon arrival, you will be paid cash on the spot, and the car will be removed from your location and worry list forever. 

As you take a train to Rockaway Beach, you undoubtedly notice a small place on the bay side of the long trestle, just beyond the railroad station at Aqueduct. Boats, fishing smacks, nets, sloops, and rowboats abound in that area, leading you to mistakenly categorize it as a fisherman’s settlement of the poorer class. However, you need to be corrected. Ramblersville is the most interesting of all the little places on Jamaica Bay.

Arguably the smallest neighborhood in New York City, Ramblersville, also known as Hamilton Beach, consists of three spits of land between Howard Beach and JFK International Airport. These land formations extend into a hooked strip of water called Hawtree Basin, which connects with Bergen Basin and Shellbank Basin before flowing into Jamaica Bay.

Here, water shapes the way of life. All the streets in Ramblersville culminate in Hawtree Basin, and canals are spanned by crisscrossing bridges. On a weekend afternoon in early spring, the air resonates with sounds that evoke another era: seagulls cawing, men hammering hollowly as they mend a wooden dock, dogs barking at front doors, their noses leaving streaks on the storm glass, and mothers calling out to their kids, who swiftly pedal past on bikes, weaving through the cul-de-sacs.

Rainbow whirligigs and patriotic flags adorn the neighborhood of Ramblersville, along with Easter and Saint Patrick’s Day decorations. Mailboxes take on whimsical shapes, resembling churches, barns, lighthouses, or sometimes all three.

Although planes from JFK rumble closely over rooftops, and the A train rattles past just yards from the doorsteps (the gleaming Howard Beach AirTrain station is a short walk away across a marsh), this neighborhood exudes a sense of being out of step with urban life. Bayview Avenue, a wooden boardwalk flanked by picket fences, defines one street. Boats are typical, parked on trailers in driveways, bumping against docks, lying belly up by the sides of roads, and stashed in vacant lots surrounded by beach grass. If the chickens in this yard were to take flight, they would see the sparkling waters of Jamaica Bay connecting this sleepy neighborhood to the world.

Beneath each of the Dead End signs along 104th Street, which is as close to Main Street as Ramblersville has, despite its Broadway, some local children have tacked wooden stars painted with inspirational messages. Most have faded in the sea breeze, but one message remains visible: “You can do whatever you think you can.” This adage serves as a fitting reminder that there is always more to explore in New York, even when you think you’ve come to its end.

History

The Brooklyn Daily Eagle reported on August 10, 1902, that for most individuals, the Howard Beach–JFK Airport station serves primarily as a transfer point between the subway and the AirTrain. However, it also functions as a gateway to Ramblersville. More than a century ago, well before the constant roar of jet engines disrupted the serene atmosphere, the station’s forerunner shared its name with a distinctive settlement nearby.

In 1880, the New York, Woodhaven, and Rockaway Railroad inaugurated its 4-mile trestle over Jamaica Bay (then commonly referred to as Grassy Bay), providing direct service to Far Rockaway and easier access to the farmland and swamps north of the bay. Before the decade’s close, Oscar Rust had erected “a small fishing station” on the swampland surrounding Hawtree Creek.

Several other enterprising builders promptly followed suit, situating their vacation homes on stilts, just high enough to allow the tides to lap at their front doors twice daily. Chroniclers of those early days dubbed it “a Venice on stilts” and “a bit of old Holland.”

Old time resident

For most of her 93 years, Catherine M. Doxsey has resided in Ramblersville, a 19th-century fishing enclave that transformed into a 20th-century summer home community and is now the smallest neighborhood in NYC. Throughout her life, the great-grandmother has confronted various challenges, from contending with City Hall for sewage lines to defending Ramblersville’s reputation against detractors. Most recently, she fought for her home after Hurricane Sandy decimated it.

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